Search

enhanced by Google

latest music news

BBC 'appalled' by Savile's crimes

The BBC said it was "appalled" that Jimmy Savile preyed on victims on its premises and again apologised to those affected.

A report by Scotland Yard and the NSPCC revealed that the television presenter committed sexual offences while employed by the BBC, including at the recording of the last episode of Top Of The Pops in 2006.

A BBC spokesman said: "The police report into Jimmy Savile contains shocking revelations. As we have made clear, the BBC is appalled that some of the offences were committed on its premises.

"We would like to restate our sincere apology to the victims of these crimes. The BBC will continue to work with the police to help them investigate these matters.

"We have also set up the Dame Janet Smith Review to help us understand how these crimes could have been committed and how we can avoid them happening ever again."

It was revealed that Savile allegedly sexually touched a girl aged 13 to 16 at the last Top Of The Pops recording in 2006.

He was also invited into schools when children wrote to him as part of the Jim'll Fix It series.

A total of 14 offences have been recorded which relate to schools, the report said.

The BBC has launched its own review of the culture and practices at the broadcaster during the years in which Jimmy Savile worked there, between 1965 and 2006.

It also undertook a separate investigation, the Pollard Review led by former Sky News executive Nick Pollard, which examined a shelved Newsnight report into Savile's abuse.

Mr Pollard found that the decision to drop the story plunged the BBC into "chaos and confusion", revealing a corporation where "leadership and organisation seemed to be in short supply".

The corporation also faced criticism over a 450,000 pay-off given to former director-general George Entwistle, who resigned after just 54 days in the job as a result of his handling of the fall-out from the Savile crisis.

BBC Trust chairman Lord Patten said last month the corporation was looking at whether it could get some of the money back, but said he doubted that any bid to recoup some of the cash would be successful.

During a press briefing, Peter Saunders, from the National Association for People Abused in Childhood (Napac), said he was told that Lord Patten had turned down plans to set up a helpline for potential victims, as suggested by Mr Entwistle.

The BBC Trust issued a statement to say: "This is not an accurate account of events. The BBC worked with, and took advice from, both the NSPCC and Napac in the immediate aftermath of the Savile revelations.

"Initial discussions were held with both organisations around the need for a dedicated hotline for victims, which would have been run by NSPCC with the assistance of Napac.

"The chairman of the NSPCC told Lord Patten that he believed that there was no need for the BBC to establish a separate hotline as he was confident that they were fully able to deal with the volume of calls.

"Lord Patten never dismissed the idea. Although Napac would still have preferred to launch a new helpline, the BBC decided not to proceed following further discussions with both charities."

Turning to the latest police and NSPCC report, the trust said: "In response to today's report itself, the BBC Trust believes the details now made public are truly shocking and we reiterate our sincere apologies to all the victims of Jimmy Savile."

be the first to comment

Add your comment
Bookmark and Share
music videosAlt TextI Am Everyoneliveradiomobile downloads