UK & World News

  • 28 April 2014, 17:50

Stephen Sutton: Dying Teen 'Coughs Up Tumour'

A terminally-ill teenager, whose cancer charity appeal has won worldwide support and admiration, has revealed his condition "dramatically improved" after he "coughed up a tumour".

Stephen Sutton disclosed details of what he described as "the most bizarre but fortunate twist in the tale yet" on his Facebook page, on which he has published a bucket list of things he wants to do before he dies.

From around mid-afternoon on Sunday he developed a slight cough and later wrote: "After a lying there for a bit longer the coughing increased and then suddenly the shortness of breath became incredibly severe.

"Amongst frantic hand pointing and panicking I felt like I was like suffocating.

"Then I forced out an oval red stained solid object through my mouth.

"My breathing and airway straight away felt clearer, but I spent the next hour violently coughing and choking, but then eventually my breathing once again stabilised.

"Since then, my breathing has dramatically improved. I'm really stuck for the words of how to describe it.

"Throughout the night my throat was pretty sore but my O2 and other saturation levels are great. This morning I am relying on NO external oxygen to breath at all and I'm feeling bloody fantastic!!

"The doctors have discussed what's happened and the only plausible conclusion is that I've literally coughed up a tumour."

The 19-year-old has now raised more than†£3m for the Teenage Cancer Trust, with more than 122,000 people - including celebrities Stephen Fry and Russell Brand - pledging their support.

A last-minute fundraising gig organised by comedian Jason Manford†last night at his comedy club in Birmingham sold out in minutes.

Stephen, who was diagnosed with incurable colorectal cancer at the age of 15, has also released a 10-minute YouTube video called When Life Gives You Cancer, featuring interviews with his mum, his school teachers and his best friend.

As donations continue to flood in, JustGiving itself donated £50,000 to Stephen's appeal.

The website currently stands to make more than £148,000 from the 5% fee it charges charities for online donations.

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