UK & World News

  • 7 July 2014, 20:04

Whistle-Blower: Sex Abuse Links Must Be Probed

The original whistle-blower in the North Wales care home scandal has called for potential links to the Westminster child abuse allegations to be thoroughly investigated.

In 1986 Alison Taylor was sacked as head of a North Wales care home, but her determination to expose the abuse eventually led to police investigations and criminal prosecutions.

Care homes across North Wales were implicated and a renewed police investigation, named Operation Pallial, is still ongoing.

Ms Taylor was vilified for speaking out decades ago and met fearsome opposition to her claims in Westminster.

She told Sky News: "I wonder were my complaints squashed because they hit too close to home.

"We know that some boys went on London trips and we know from the evidence of some others that they were taken to various hotels in the North Wales area for that purpose, and I think it is fair to say there is more to this than people want the rest of us to know."

Ms Taylor added: "If there are links there won't be much of a will to prove them... and it is the will that matters."

Some 18 months ago Sky News exclusively revealed the account of "Michael", who was abused in the care system in North Wales.

He explained how he was often forced onto a minibus, taken to sex parties in London and abused by a string of men.

A second police investigation, Operation Fernbridge, led by the Metropolitan police is trying to establish if a paedophile ring was operating in and around Westminster at the same time as the North Wales care home scandal. 

A spokesman for the police investigation focused in North Wales said: "The National Crime Agency (NCA) is in regular communication with police forces across the country and has met with Senior Investigators for other inquiries to share information and best practice.

"This regular contact will continue for the duration of Operation Pallial."

Two special inquiries have been set up to investigate allegations of widespread child abuse in Westminster during the 1980s.

The inquiries, one headed by NSPCC chief Peter Wanless, were announced by Home Secretary Theresa May in a speech to the House of Commons.

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