sport

Lizzie eyes multi-medal game glory

Lizzie Armitstead is targeting glory on the track and the road at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

The 24-year-old Yorkshirewoman won silver in the London 2012 Olympic road race and is a multiple world medallist on the track, where she favours the bunch races which will be included in the Commonwealth programme but are not part of the Olympics.

Armitstead is hoping to secure one of three English spots for the points and scratch races at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome next summer, with track specialists Laura Trott, Dani King and Joanna Rowsell also in contention.

Armitstead told Press Association Sport: "I'm aiming for the track as well (as the road) because it's the events I enjoy and have had some success in.

"I've got to prove that I'm in good shape at the time. I've got a couple of Revolutions next year which I'll try to do well in.

"That's the very start of my season, so I'm not going to be in top shape, but hopefully I'll be able to show I've got track craft.

"It's a very competitive team to get into. It's not a given, but I think I've got a good chance."

Armitstead won the British Championships on the road race course last June and will hope to go one better than she did in Delhi in 2010.

She added: "It's a difficult race to race tactically. There's lots of different opportunities.

"I really like the course. If it's a hard race it will suit me better. It would be nice to drop some of the out-and-out sprinters that the Australians have a few of."

Despite her plans to ride on the boards in Glasgow, Armitstead has no plans to challenge for a track place for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, where the team pursuit is the priority and the omnium a secondary event.

"It's a very competitive environment now and to be in that team you'd have to focus on the track," added Armitstead, a team pursuit world champion in 2010.

"I just love the road too much. There's no way I could give up my road season to be a track rider. It's decision made for me.

"Points and scratch race you can definitely train as a road rider. It's not quite so specific."

Armitstead is now back on the road following three weeks off after the season-ending Road World Championships in Italy.

Her aims for the 2014 road season are familiar ones.

"It's the same targets as I normally have, because I've not quite managed it yet," Armitstead said.

"Flanders - the Commonwealth Games is a new target - and then the World Championships."

First there is a family Christmas to enjoy in Otley, where the festivities will likely include a family bike ride.

Armitstead, who is attending next summer's Dare 2b Yorkshire Festival of Cycling at Harewood House ahead of the Tour de France beginning in Leeds, believes the region is the leading place in the world for cycling.

"When the weather's good, it's the best place," said Armitstead, who is based in Monaco.

"It's had a big influence on me being successful in cycling.

"As a junior I was training on pretty tough terrain. It's relentless.

"You're up and down all day. The roads are really heavy.

"Everything's pretty much covered. Hills and the flat. It teaches you to be tough.

"If the weather was a lot better I'd be there all the time. When you're having to do it every single day of your life, it's a little bit different."