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Sunday matters to Dudek

Cambridge would trade every other result in the year for victory against the odds in Sunday's Boat Race, according to president Steve Dudek.

Cambridge would trade every other result in the year for victory against the odds in Sunday's Boat Race, according to president Steve Dudek.

Dudek and his Cambridge crew are desperate to deny Oxford their fifth Boat Race victory in seven years on the River Thames this weekend.

The 25-year-old land economy student said every other university challenge pales into insignificance alongside the traditional bragging-rights battle.

"The Boat Race is what we're here to do," Dudek told the BBC.

"Every result beforehand means nothing.

"We could lose every single fixture leading up to the race in the most embarrassing fashion and if we come out and won on the day in London, I'll take that."

Ivo Dawkins will face his first Boat Race, 36 years after father Will competed in the Cambridge crew that sank.

The 20-year-old engineering student hopes technology has developed far enough to mean such forgettable days are a thing of the past.

"These days we have got pumps and splashboards, which protect the side of the boat and push any water out, so it is highly unlikely," Dawkins told the Guardian.

"He's [father Will] told me to approach it with confidence and to live the experience."

Oxford meanwhile are intent on making their perceived dominance count when it matters most.

Despite holding the title and even their opponents dubbing them favourites, the Dark Blues themselves are taking nothing for granted.

"I'm determined to leave without having lost a race," said 2011 and 2013 winner Constantine Louloudis.

Louloudis took a year out of his Classics degree in 2012 to help Great Britain's Men's Eight to Olympics bronze in London.

The 22-year-old Londoner is keen to sign off in style, but knows the race's unpredictability means Oxford can ill afford complacency.

"You can't go in with too much confidence. In 2012 we saw how it could go wrong," he told the BBC.

Oxford hope to benefit from using the Great Britain training facilities at Caversham in the Boat Race build-up.

Oxford's crew is bolstered by the presence of 29-year-old Kiwi lightweight double sculls world champion from 2009, Storm Uru.

The Invercargill native is taking on an MBA at Keble College, and will bring his wide experience to bear, not least his bronze at London 2012.

"I think we're in good shape but it has been quite a challenge," Oxford coach Sean Bowden told the BBC.

"We are fortunate that we have been able to use the Redrgrave-Pinsent Rowing Lake where the national team are based."